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Built in 1765, the Hallock homestead in Northville, seen here in the 1930s, is celebrating 250 years of history this Saturday afternoon at Hallockville Museum Farm. (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)
Built in 1765, the Hallock homestead in Northville, seen here in the 1930s, is celebrating 250 years of history this Saturday afternoon at Hallockville Museum Farm. (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)

In 1765, newlyweds Reuben and Elinor Brown built the earliest portion of what is today one of Sound Avenue’s most historic houses.    

“It’s really exciting to reflect on the last 250 years and also look toward the future to see what we might accomplish as an organization on the North Fork,” said Hallockville’s assistant director, Beth Motschenbacher. “It’s an important time to reflect on [the Hallocks’] contributions to the farming community on Sound Avenue over that 250-year period.” 

This weekend’s celebration takes place from 1 to 4 p.m. and include tours of the museum’s various buildings like the homestead, which is decorated with Victorian furniture; Colonial-era military re-enactments; and craft demonstrations. Children will have the opportunity to feed the resident chickens, cows and sheep and a new photography exhibit chronicling Hallockville’s history will make its debut.

David Halsey Hallock and 'Crissy the Cat' at the back of the homestead's barn on May 4, 1925.  (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)
David Halsey Hallock and ‘Crissy the Cat’ at the back of the homestead’s barn on May 4, 1925. (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)

For more on the Hallockville homestead’s two-and-a-half centuries of history, check out the following timeline:

1765 Reuben Brown and his wife, Elinor, build the earliest portion of what later becomes known as the Hallock homestead.

1790s The Browns sell the homestead to the Hallock family. At the time, the property is a one-and-a- half-story house. Later, a full second story is added.

1814 Some of Riverhead’s founding fathers fight off the British just a few hundred feet from the homestead in a once-forgotten War of 1812 battle.

1851 The Hallocks lay a lead pipeline from their pond down to the homestead, providing running water for their house and barn.

1973 The homestead is sold to Long Island Lighting Company, which announces an ill-fated plan to build four nuclear power plants on the property.

1975 Local residents begin meeting in order to devise a way to save the homestead.

A 1930s photo of Ella Arminda Hallock with her violin on the homestead's front porch.  (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)
A 1930s photo of Ella Arminda Hallock with her violin on the homestead’s front porch. (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)

1981 After the homestead’s owner, Ella Hallock, cedes her life-tenancy rights and moves to a nursing home, LILCO donates the house to Hallockville Museum Farm.

1984 The homestead is placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

2014 Colonial re-enactors commemorate the War of 1812 battle fought near the homestead with firearms demonstrations and cannon firing, among other activities.

2015 The homestead turns 250 years old and is feted in a weekend celebration at the museum farm.

All timeline information taken from local historian RichardWines’ 2008 “History of Hallockville: The Museum Farm, the neighborhood and the surrounding land including Jamesport State Park.”

Lois Estelle Wells bottle-feeds a lamb in the homestead's backyard in April 1926.  (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)
Lois Estelle Wells bottle-feeds a lamb in the homestead’s backyard in April 1926. (Credit: Hallockville Museum Farm, courtesy)

As part of its 250th anniversary celebration, Hallockville is holding a raffle fundraiser to support preservation initiatives. Tickets are $10 each or $50 for a book of six and can be purchased at hallockville.com   or museum events. Prizes include a handmade 250th anniversary celebration quilt, wooden carvings, a woven table runner and other pieces made by volunteer artisans. The drawing will be held Oct. 18 at the museum’s annual member and volunteer reception.

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