08/27/16 6:07am
Lobster tail broiled with just a little melted butter and paprika. (Credit: John Ross)

Lobster tail broiled with just a little melted butter and paprika. (Credit: John Ross)

Having a lobster dinner as Labor Day approaches is a ritual for many North Fork families, including mine. Lobsters make a festive presentation and are messy to eat, making them perfect for the deck or patio.

Lobsters are best when purchased live and cooked right away. Boiling is the easiest method and the traditional New England one, but Long Island has a long tradition of stuffing lobsters with breadcrumbs and baking them.

My recipe that follows is a combination of the two methods with a little sautéeing thrown in. The claws are boiled, then the knuckle meat is removed and added to the stuffing along with the tomalley and coral. The lobster is stuffed and baked, then reassembled to make an attractive presentation. The result is a delicious lobster dish that utilizes all of its parts, makes an attractive presentation and is easy to eat. (more…)

03/26/16 12:00pm
Twice-smoked bourbon-glazed ham is the centerpiece of a traditional Easter dinner. (Credit: John Ross)

Twice-smoked bourbon-glazed ham is the centerpiece of a traditional Easter dinner. (Credit: John Ross)

The pig has lived only to eat, he eats only to die. … He eats everything his gluttonous snout touches, he will be eaten completely. … He eats all the time, he will be eaten all the time. … His ignoble gluttony is echoed in terrible fashion. … The pig is nothing but an immense dish which walks while waiting to be served. …

In a sort of photography of his future destiny, everything announces that he will be eaten, but eaten in such a fashion that there will remain of him not the smallest bone, not a hair, not an atom. (more…)

10/25/15 11:25am
Vine Street Café placed third for its dish. (Credit: Monique Singh-Roy)

Vine Street Café placed third for its mushroom bolognese sauce with penne pasta, tomato, parmesan and parsley. (Credit: Monique Singh-Roy)

Touch of Venice made a mushroom crostini with maitake, shiitake, oyster mushrooms, wild arugula, ricotta and Parmigiano-Reggiano. Grana of Jamesport made a bruschetta with roasted oyster mushroom, toasted walnut pesto and mushroom aioli dish.

While Shelter Island’s Vine Street Café served up a mushroom bolognese sauce with penne pasta, tomato, parmesan and parsley.

But the star of the shows was Noah’s with its duck confit and shiitake mushroom pan-fried dumplings, served with a mushroom and cabbage slaw in an orange miso sauce. (more…)