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Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

If it were up to me, I’d have my house be similar to that of a greenhouse. To have a roof made of glass like one giant skylight window would be stellar. Falling asleep under the stars and waking up to the sun streaming through; what more could you want? 

Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

After blankets and baking, one of my favorite things to get caught up in is sunlight. The soft way it will stream through a glass window creating beams of hazy warm yellow, dust particles dancing and doing the tango. Certain windows filter sunlight differently than others. Some change the color while others might create a sheer patch of rainbow. My absolute favorite window (after the eyes, which we’ve all heard is the one to the soul) resides at the Star Confectionery. One faces Ronoake Ave and connects to the window front on Main Street. The 90 degree angle of glass creates the most beautiful bursts of light from the setting sun. It glows over the counter tops and sometimes it’s so strong, the homemade chocolates have to be covered with newspaper to prevent melting.

Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

The day we took pictures of our pumpkin pie, we realized we wanted to plate the pie with ice cream and it was quickly decided there was no better choice than to use homemade ice cream. But where could one get homemade ice cream in the middle of November? Predicament quickly avoided: year round the Star Confectionery serves flavors from rum raisin to vanilla, strawberry to peach. As we sliced and plated our pie, the afternoon sun lighting up the photo-shoot and melting our pumpkin ice cream, I realized how lucky we are to have places such as the Star still in existence.

Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

From the floors to the counter top, the milkshake handles to the fountain, the Star is the one luncheonette on Main Street that’s been around since 1920 and still going strong. Even if pumpkin pie doesn’t suit your fancy, I’d find it hard to believe the Star Confectionary doesn’t peak your interest, much like this stiff meringue.

Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

Meringue Pumpkin Pie

All Butter Pie Crust

  • 2 ½ cups flour
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 sticks (1 cup) salted butter – cold
  • 1 cup of water with ice cubes

In a large bowl, mix flour and sugar. Dice up (or grate) butter into flour mixture. If using hands (alternatively a pastry blender) work butter in until crumbly and course, like oatmeal. Slowly drizzle the cold water (minus ice cubes) into mixture. I usually use just shy of the one cup. Work dough together and form into ball and wrap with saran wrap and put in fridge to keep cold.

Meringue*

*start making when the pie is 35-40 minutes into baking.

  • 3 egg whites
  • 5 tablespoons sugar

Beat ingredients until stiff peak forms, so that when you lift the beater the meringue holds a tall upright peak.

Pumpkin Pie

  • 15 ounces canned pumpkin
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 can (12 oz) evaporated milk

In a large bowl, beat eggs. Add sugars and spices and mix until thoroughly combined. Slowly add evaporated milk while stirring. Pour into chilled pie crust and brush edges/rim of crust with a beaten egg to give the crust a browned color when baked. Bake in 425 degree oven for 15 minutes then reduce heat to 350 and bake for 40 minutes. Top with meringue and let bake an additional 15 minutes, allowing the peaks of meringue on the pie to brown. Let chill completely, about 2 hours before cutting and serving. Adorn with [homemade] ice cream!

Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris
Photo by Kaitlyn Ferris

Writer Aiyana Edmund and photographer Kaitlyn Ferris are North Fork natives who together explore and adore Long Island’s sights, smells and sounds, usually found at golden hour. They bring an appreciation of local and homegrown ingredients to their recipes and are inspired by the simple things in life, like manual focus and windowsill grown herbs.  See more of their recipes at savorysenses.com.

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