06/24/17 5:01am

North Fork Chef John Ross at work in his home office. (Credit: Lois Ross)

As you, my loyal readers, know, I enjoy a little poetry with my food, along with good company. Poems provide inspiration that takes mundane cooking to a higher level. And cooking from scratch, using the freshest ingredients, is therapy for me and almost becomes a spiritual experience.

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06/10/17 6:01am

Asian barbecued pork with stir-fried spring vegetables and jasmine rice. (Credit: John Ross)

As time passes and our knowledge of food and cooking increases, we seem to be much more confident around the outdoor barbecue. The equipment is more sophisticated, the deck is bigger and our repertoire of recipes is expanding. In my backyard I have a pop-up tent that covers a Big Green Egg, a Weber charcoal grill, an old smoker and a portable Green Egg. (more…)

04/15/17 9:16am
Start your Easter meal with deviled eggs surrounded by avocado, grapefruit and baby kale. (Credit: John Ross)

Start your Easter meal with deviled eggs surrounded by avocado, grapefruit and baby kale. (Credit: John Ross)

Although lamb is more commonly served in the spring and at Easter due to its long tradition dating back centuries, smoked ham is a popular second choice. This came from a scarcity of lamb in northern Europe and the tradition there of smoking and curing ham over the winter. This tradition continued in colonial America, especially in the South. Today, we continue to enjoy smoked ham as a choice for Easter.

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04/01/17 6:00am
Braised chicken with hard cider and pears. (Credit: John Ross)

Braised chicken with hard cider and pears. (Credit: John Ross)

Food and beverages affect us in many different ways and at every level of our journey through life.

We learn to eat what is around us for sustenance from a very early age. During this time we develop tastes for familiar things in our environment that are then influenced by our culture. As we grow older we discover the enjoyment of food and those who consume it with us, no matter what our circumstances are in life.

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03/18/17 6:00am
Slow-poached wild salmon with mussels and green sauce. (Credit: John Ross)

Slow-poached wild salmon with mussels and green sauce. (Credit: John Ross)

In “Walking the Poems of Ireland, Marilyn J. Middleton writes: “The landscape of Ireland became a poem upon my mind. I had seen those ghostly misty landscapes before. I had touched the ancient high crosses and felt the feelings of pilgrims long before that had touched them also. Touring Ireland was for me like going somewhere where you knew you belonged and finding some lost part of yourself …

“We arrived at the little seacoast harbor town of Dingle. … The sea here gave harvests of wild mussels, salmon, and shrimp.”

I have not traveled to Ireland, but I know the feeling that this author conveys in her book. I have experienced it in Germany when visiting the small, medieval villages that seem (more…)

03/04/17 6:00am
The humble hamburger gets special treatment, with hand-ground beef, a homemade bun, coleslaw and roasted french fries. (Credit: John Ross)

The humble hamburger gets special treatment, with hand-ground beef, a homemade bun, coleslaw and roasted french fries. (Credit: John Ross)

The hamburger is a culinary icon in the United States. It is an American symbol of a fast-moving lifestyle where convenience is king.

Its origins are in the late 19th century as immigrants populated a rapidly industrializing America. Many immigrants came from northern Europe and crossed the ocean on Hamburg America Line ships. These ships served a seasoned minced beef along with bread. This may have inspired the name of the future American sandwich of ground beef served on a bun.
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02/18/17 9:55am
Split roasted fingerling potatoes and guacamole with Gorgonzola and bacon. (Credit: John Ross)

Split roasted fingerling potatoes and guacamole with Gorgonzola and bacon. (Credit: John Ross)

Cheese has been around for thousands of years. Along with bread, beer, wine and a few other foods, people learned how to let “good bacterial cultures” transform perishables into delicious foods that could be held without refrigeration and consumed over a long period of time. They could be called the first “convenience” foods.

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