03/08/17 2:05pm

Waking prior to sunrise on a cold winter’s day, I go outside to Emmy’s mew (enclosure) where she has spent the night dreaming about today’s squirrel hunt. Lifting her from her perch, I place her in a large plastic transport box, known as a giant hood, and load her into the back seat of my truck. I then toss my hawking satchel and walking stick into the truck and we drive off to one of our hunting locations. (more…)

02/06/17 6:01am
Chris Paparo with Emmy. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

Chris Paparo with Emmy. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

For those of you that follow my various social media accounts (@fishguyphotos), you will notice that during the winter months I frequently post pictures of a red-tailed hawk.

Typically, the hawk in the picture is located on the ground and holding a freshly caught squirrel or rabbit in her sharp talons. At first glance, it appears that I always seem to be at the right place at the right time, capturing a moment in nature that so few of us get to see in person. That feeling of awe quickly turns to disbelief when the next post is a “hawk selfie” or a video of a hawk landing on my hand. Why would such a majestic bird allow me into its world time and time again?

In addition to being the “Fish Guy,” I am a general class falconer and the hawk featured in those posts is my red-tailed hawk Emmy.   (more…)

01/03/17 6:01am
Chris Paparo Fish Guy Photo

A juvenile great black-backed gull. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

With temperatures dipping into the teens, it seems as if Old Man Winter has finally arrived on the North Fork.

For the “fair-weather” birder, these bitter cold temperatures can hamper their favorite activity. Hopefully these same birders read my article from September, when I described how to create an oasis in your backyard for our feathered friends. With any luck, their backyards are currently bustling with wildlife that they are enjoying from the comfort and warmth of their home.

For those that did not prepare ahead of time, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy birding on the North Fork. You will just need to bundle up. (more…)

11/16/16 6:00am


The first Monday in November is a date that gets every seafood lover’s mouth salivating.

It is opening day of bay scallop season.

These delicious morsels are only available during the winter months and the demand is always high for them. In the days leading up to the opener, scallopers ready their dredges, dig out their viewing boxes, and service their dive gear. (more…)

10/31/16 6:03am

scallop3

For many, the fall harvest is winding down on the North Fork. Most grapes have been picked and are fermenting, pumpkins have been carved and apples have been turned into delicious pies and warm cider.

But for our local baymen and seafood lovers, another highly anticipated harvest is about to begin — the opening of bay scallop season on Monday, Nov. 7. (more…)

10/17/16 6:00am
The author holds up a black sea bass. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

The author holds up a black sea bass. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

It is time to celebrate the fall harvest on the North Fork. Trekking from great distances, people flood onto the North Fork in search of the freshest vegetables, the juiciest apples, the savoriest of wines, and of course, the “Great Pumpkin.” Although the fall harvest typically focuses on agricultural products, there is another North Fork commodity that is just as equally sought after; seafood. Fishing has been and continues to play an important role in the heritage of the North Fork.

And as temperatures begin to drop, the fishing really heats up. (more…)

09/13/16 6:02am
A ruby-throated hummingbird. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

A ruby-throated hummingbird. (Credit: Chris Paparo)

With an estimate of over 47 million people observing feathered wildlife, birding is quickly becoming one of the most popular hobbies in the country. Whether you are young or old, live an active lifestyle or one of a couch potato, you can be a birder.

For most people it is hard to see the appeal in bird watching. To the non-birder, there are only a couple different “types” of birds (sparrows, pigeons, sea gulls, storks, and hawks/eagles) and with the exception of hawks/eagles, those creatures are commonplace and not worth a second look. Surprisingly though, there are actually 914 different species of birds naturally occurring in North America, each with a unique set of characteristics.   (more…)