2 upcoming Greenport lectures focus on state of East End waters

Cedar beach water bay

Cedar Beach in Southold. (Credit: Vera Chinese, file photo)

Surrounded by bays, the Sound and the great Atlantic Ocean, is it any wonder Long Islanders love the water?

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County’s Marine Program will partner with the Greenport Village Trustees this summer to present a series of lectures about the area’s vital marine resources.

On July 10, Greg Rivera, CCE’s community aquaculture specialist will provide an in-depth look at the local oyster industry with “Oysters on the East End: Past, Present and Future.” Rivera will cover the oyster industry’s rich past, its current situation and thoughts on the future of shellfish farming on the East End.

“Locally-produced oysters are an important part of the locavore movement, whether served in an upscale restaurant, paired with local wines in a vineyard setting or slurped with an East End beer overlooking the water,” said Rivera.

Then on August 14, the CCE’s fisheries team will provide a look at the commercial fishing industry with “Commercial Fishing: What Does the Future Hold.” They’ll present the current status of our fisheries, explain where our fish come from and what choices you can make to support your local commercial fishing industry.

Chris Pickerell, CCE’s marine program director, kicked off the series with “What’s New in Marine Species Management and Restoration” on June 12 where he discussed recently completed projects and some currently underway in local waters.

“I really want people to have a better understanding of the interesting work taking place all around Long Island and how they can get involved and do their part,” said Pickerell.

The two upcoming lectures are free of charge and will take place at the Little Red Schoolhouse on Front Street in Greenport Village, beginning at 7 p.m.

The series is part of the CCE’s Marine Program’s “30 Ways to Give Back to the Bays”campaign in celebration of the organization’s 30th anniversary. CCE’s Marine Program has been working to improve the water quality of our bays, improving habitat availability for marine species and restoring stocks of commercial and recreational shellfish and finfish since 1985.

2 Comment

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