Prostitution exhibit explores North Fork’s sordid past

This rare, circa-1930 sign from a Long Island bar warns prostitutes that they must be free of venereal diseases before attempting to solicit customers. (Credit: Rachel Young)

This rare, circa-1930 sign from a Long Island bar warns prostitutes that they must be free of venereal diseases before attempting to solicit customers. (Credit: Rachel Young)

She called herself “Madam Pamn.” And what a sight she must have been, sashaying from the Long Island Rail Road train in Greenport from New York City every Friday afternoon, a trail of working girls behind her.

For decades, the Georgia-born African-American entrepreneur, who drove a pink Cadillac and often sported an orange wig, operated a brothel at Sea Breeze Cottages near Main Road in Greenport, said Amy Folk, special collections manager at Southold Historical Society.

“She made an opportunity for herself,” Folk said. “Granted, it’s not an opportunity most mothers would want their daughters to follow, but she made it. And in that respect, it shows she was a very strong person.”

The story of Madam Pamn, born Bessie Kitchens, is just one element of a rarely acknowledged but conspicuous period of local history. That aspect of our past is now the subject of Southold Historical Society’s newest exhibit, “No Peeking: A History of Prostitution in Southold Town,” on view through Dec. 13 at the Reichert Family Center’s Cosden Price Gallery on Main Road.

Curated by Folk, the exhibit explores the local history of “the world’s oldest profession,” which first became publicly documented here in the very late 1800s.

Artifacts on display include a pair of letters written in 1884 by a young man to a friend in Mattituck that provide salacious details about his experiences with prostitutes in Cuba.

“We have lots of fun here and plenty of nice gals here and we have lots of rum,” the young man wrote. “I am drunk every night.”

Also included is a rare circa 1930 sign from a Long Island saloon warning “girls from the red light district” that they must be free of venereal diseases before attempting to solicit customers.

COURTESY PHOTO A 1959 photo of the Pastime Inn, a Peconic 'hotel' that may have been a brothel.

A 1959 photo of the Pastime Inn, a Peconic ‘hotel’ that may have been a brothel. (Credit: Courtesy photo)

About two decades before this placard was erected, sexually transmitted diseases spread by prostitutes had become so rampant that the New York State Legislature passed a law requiring that anyone arrested on prostitution charges be examined by a doctor and given a clean bill of health before their release from jail, Folk said.

In Southold Town, this became the job of Dr. J. Mott Heath, a respected physician and future president of the board at Eastern Long Island Hospital in Greenport, who died in 1956.

It’s entirely possible that Madam Pamn’s girls were arrested for prostitution charges at some point, but Greenport’s local police force mostly turned a blind eye when it came to her brothel because she helped establish a form of social order in the village, Folk said.

In the years surrounding the end of Prohibition, she explained, Greenport officials had a tough time keeping bunker fishermen off the streets.

“There was a large upswing in violence and they had a great deal of difficulty controlling it,” Folk said. To a large degree, she said, Madam Pamn changed that by encouraging the men to spend all their free time at her brothel.

At Madam Pamn’s 1976 funeral, then-Southold Town Supervisor Albert Martocchia reportedly eulogized her as the “woman who saved Greenport during the Great Depression.”